Updates: Our operations during wartime

We are fully staffed, and all of our suppliers are active. And of course we appreciate our customers' ongoing support. We'll try to keep this page updated.

Update, 4 Iyar (12 May) - The average shipping times for the last three pickups before Passover was 12 days for First Class parcels to the US; for the first batch dispatched after Passover the average was quite speedy  just 8 days. Please note that this week we have no pickups on Memorial Day (Mon.) and Independence Day (Tues.), both of which are national holidays.

Update, 6 Nissan (14 Apr.) - This morning both Israel Post and DHL drivers did today's scheduled pickups as usual, despite the Iranian attack. Since the short airport shutdown disrupted flights, that could have a ripple effect, which could slow down Israel Post shipments (First Class and EMS), but is unlikely to have any impact on DHL shipping times. Also, any orders placed this week are likely to dispatch on Thurs. or Sun., which is only 1-2 business days before Passover, which means they might be subject to significant delays.

Update, 19 Adar II (29 Mar.) - Average shipping time for First Class parcels sent to the US during the first half of March was 14 days. Note that winter weather sometimes has an impact.

Update, 9 Adar II (19 Mar.) - While reviewing shipping times for First Class parcels sent to the US in late Feb. and early Mar., we were surprised to see a significant number of shipments were held for customs inspections, which has been fairly uncommon in the past. Customers whose order is time-sensitive might want to consider our express shipping option.
Note: We are closed on Sunday for Purim, and our staff will be working minimal hours on Monday (Shushan Purim), so essentially we're headed toward a four-day weekend.

Update, 17 Adar I (26 Feb.) - Typical shipping time for First Class parcels has been around two weeks during Feb. Note that this week we have no shipping pickups on Tues., due to the elections in Israel.

Update, 18 Shevat (28 Jan.) - Typical shipping time for First Class parcels has been two weeks or less this month. (Parcels sent to the US last week may be subject to delays; the USPS website currently has a notice posted regarding severe weather conditions.) DHL Express takes 2-3 business days to most US locations.

Update, 22 Tevet (3 Jan.) - First Class shipping times have become much faster. Given the large volume of shipping in the US and other countries during the first half of Dec. every year, the slow shipping times we saw were fairly predictable. Since then shipping time has dropped dramatically; typical shipping time appears to be 10-20 days for First Class. Regarding DHL express, during the third week of Dec. shipping times were a bit longer than usual, but now are averaging just 3-4 business days.

Update, 8 Tevet (20 Dec.) - DHL shipping is fine. Regarding our First Class shipping option, based on our review of the shipping data since the middle of November, it looks like First Class shipping to the US is leaving Israel within five business days after dispatch from our office, however, many parcels appear to be sitting unscanned at the International Sorting Centers in the US. Presumably this is a result of bottlenecking at USPS due to the heavy volume of parcels handled in the US every year during the month of December. If so, we expect shipping times to start improving shortly. Regarding parcels sent around the beginning of Dec., shipping time appears to be 2-5 weeks via First Class, while express shipping via DHL is typically 2-3 business days.

Update, 14 Kislev (27 Nov.) - DHL shipping is fine. Regarding our First Class shipping option, based on our review of the shipping data since the start of November, it looks like First Class shipping to the US is now around 2-3 weeks, in most cases.

Update, 28 Cheshvan (12 Nov.) - DHL shipping is fine. Regarding our First Class shipping option, based on our current assessments of tracking data, we're cautiously optimistic that First Class shipping, which was typically around 10 days until the war, and around 20 days in the initial weeks of the war, is now somewhere in between.  

Update, 23 Cheshvan (7 Nov.) - We're pleased to report that all the US-bound First Class parcels dispatched in mid-Oct., which were grounded in Israel for about two weeks, are now starting to move along in the US and some have already been delivered. DHL continues to uphold their usual 2-3 business days shipping times. 

Update, 18 Cheshvan (2 Nov.) - Today we spoke with a contact at Israel Post's department for international commercial shippers. She told us the severe bottlenecking is starting to ease slightly, i.e. they are starting to find a bit of space for some First Class parcels on flights. However, we still caution our customers that we would be surprised if First Class shipping gets up to speed in the next few weeks, therefore opting for our DHL express option is highly advisable. We reviewed all of the shipping data for the orders sent via DHL during Oct. and did not see any noticeable slowdown in shipping times (in most cases 2-3 business days).  

Update, 14 Cheshvan (29 Oct.) - The portal for Israel Post's commercial customers had a notice saying the wartime policy would be to maintain Israel Post service normally as a vital public service. They have now posted a new notice: "Due to the significant reduction in the number of outgoing flights from Israel as a consequence of the Swords of Iron War, delays in cargo transport are expected, including parcels to foreign countries. We are making every effort to transport the parcels to their respective destinations as soon as possible, and at this stage parcel shipping to other countries remains available, despite the possibility of delays."

After reviewing our shipments, we see that although a few parcels to Europe have left the country, all shipments to the US since 12 Oct. remain grounded in Israel. Therefore we urge all customers who would like to place an order to strongly consider our DHL option. 

Regarding Israel Post shipments already en route, we will do our best to update those customers, and hope the bottleneck of grounded parcels will ease very soon. 

Update, 8 Cheshvan (23 Oct.) - Both the DHL and Israel Post pickups were carried out as scheduled yesterday.

Update, 2 Cheshvan (17 Oct.) - Both the DHL and Israel Post pickups were carried out as scheduled this morning. A quick glance at the tracking data shows that DHL parcels are leaving the country right away and Israel Post parcels without inordinate delay.

Update, 30 Tishrei (15 Oct.) - Both the DHL and Israel Post pickups were carried out as scheduled this morning.

Update, 27 Tishrei (12 Oct.) - Both the DHL and Israel Post pickups were carried out as scheduled this morning. Next week we'll start checking the tracking data to see if Israel Post parcels are delayed leaving Israel.  

Update, 26 Tishrei (11 Oct.) - The DHL driver came for pickup as scheduled again today. He said pickups are operating as usual (except in the South).

Update, 25 Tishrei (10 Oct.) - Both the DHL and Israel Post pickups were carried out as scheduled this morning. 

Update, 24 Tishrei (9 Oct.) - DHL informed us that many of their drivers are reservists who were called up for military duty. We might not have pickup service until tomorrow. We also checked with Israel Post. They said tomorrow's pickup "depends on the security situation."

Product availability: When it comes to procurement, almost all our suppliers are working normally, but note that it might take them a bit longer to transport orders to us (domestic shipping has slowed down, largely because many drivers got called up for reserve duty). However, this should not be felt by our customers, since we keep track of the vast majority of our inventory electronically, which means if a certain size is out of stock, you'll see that right away and won't be able to place an order.

A notable exception to the above is Gabrieli hand-woven tallits. They now have a significant backlog because right after the Sukkot shutdown they had a war shutdown, and after the one-week war shutdown, half of their weavers were afraid to come back to work. Their bomb shelter is about 50 meters from the weaving studio, and some of the weavers are unable to get there on time when the sirens sound. So the studio manager has notified us that for the time being, turnaround time will be slower than usual.

 

For our customers who are interested in keeping abreast of developments in Israel, here are a few helpful links: